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Weather Ready: 5 questions about the solar eclipse to help you view it safely over Wisconsin

Wisconsin isn't in the path of Monday's total solar eclipse but a partial eclipse will be visible and we are answering five questions to help you view it safely

Weather Ready:  5 questions about the solar eclipse to help you view it safely over Wisconsin

April 4, 2024 3:57 PM CDT
By: Teri Barr

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Wisconsin isn’t in the path of Monday’s total solar eclipse but a partial eclipse will be visible and we are answering five top questions to help you view it safely

Did you know Wisconsin isn’t in the path of Monday’s total solar eclipse? You will still be able to view a partial eclipse over the Badgers State. Here’s when to expect it and how to enjoy it safely.

What is a “solar eclipse?”

A solar eclipse happens when the moon moves in front of the sun, blocking the light for just a few minutes. It’s a rare phenomenon, and after the eclipse on April 8, 2024, the next one isn’t expected for another 20 years!

LISTEN to “Weather Ready: What to expect from the solar eclipse over Wisconsin”

Why is a partial eclipse expected over Wisconsin?

A total solar eclipse will be visible in portions of the United States along a 115-mile-wide path moving southwest-to-northeast across the country. It will begin in Texas and travel through Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.

Wisconsin is not part of the direct path, but will be under a partial eclipse, with southeastern areas of the state seeing a bit more of the shadow.

You can find more detailed information about our state’s partial eclipse, and even an eclipse simulation for Wisconsin here.

How long will the solar eclipse last?

According to NASA, the solar eclipse totality will last about four minutes. But the amount of time from beginning to end, when the moon starts its path in front of the sun to when it completely moves past the sun, depends on your location. The entire process is expected to take more than two hours, starting around 12:20 pm (CST) over Dallas, Texas. The partial eclipse will be visible in Milwaukee and other parts of Wisconsin at 2 pm.

Who needs special glasses to see the eclipse?

Everyone! And it matters even if you are planning to view the partial eclipse over Wisconsin.

The eclipse glasses have a specially created filter to protect your eyes from damage. There are no other glasses, not even sunglasses, with this unique filter. Learn more about the importance of these special glasses and eye safety from NASA.

Where can you celebrate the solar eclipse?

Anywhere, but there are already a number of events and “solar eclipse” parties happening around the state. Department of Natural Resources officials are holding one, including glasses to view the eclipse and a discussion about it. Find more information at this link. You may also want to check with your library for any local events.

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